Welcome to the homepage of the Chicago Religious Leadership Network on Latin America (CRLN).

Mission: The Chicago Religious Leadership Network on Latin America (CRLN)  builds partnerships among social movements and organized communities within and between the U.S. and Latin America. We work together through popular education, grassroots organizing, public policy advocacy, and direct action to dismantle U.S. militarism, neoliberal economic and immigration policy, and other forms of state and institutional violence.We are united by our liberating faiths and inspired by the power of people to organize and to find allies to work for sustainable economies, just relationships and human dignity.  

Misión en español: La Red de Líderes Religiosos de Chicago para Latinoamérica (CRLN) construye alianzas entre movimientos sociales y comunidades organizadas en EE.UU. y entre los pueblos de las Américas. Trabajamos juntos por medio de la educación popular, la organización de base comunitaria, la promoción de políticas públicas, y la demostración no violenta pero energética para desmilitarizar nuestras sociedades, crear alternativas a la economía neoliberal y desmantelar la política de inmigración de EE.UU, y otras formas de violencia institucional y de Estado. Estamos unidxs por nuestras fes liberadoras e inspiradxs por el poder de la gente para organizar y encontrar aliadxs para trabajar por economías sostenibles, relaciones justas y la dignidad humana.

 
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CRLN gratefully acknowldges the support of the following Foundations: Crossroads Fund, Helen Brach Foundation, Landau Family Foundation, Pierce Family Charitable Foundation and Woods Fund of Chicago. 

Why we Support Action Urging Congressman Gutierrez to Fight for a Moratorium on Deportations

One week ago, five protestors including Maria Moreno, the 13 year old daughter of Jose Juan Moreno who is currently living in Sanctuary in a Chicago church, and a CRLN staff member, blocked incoming and outgoing traffic outside of Congressman Luis Gutierrez’s office. The action was led by Organized Communities Against Deportations (OCAD) and the West Suburban Action Project (PASO). The protestors were urging Congressman Gutierrez, whom Hillary Clinton recently appointed to the platform writing committee of the Democratic National Convention (DNC), to stop using harmful and divisive rhetoric that perpetuates the criminalization of immigrant communities and to focus his influence...

4 arrested -- Caceres family not notified

Family members of Berta Caceres found out May 2 only through the media that 4 arrests had been made in connection with her murder. While Honduran law gives victims of crimes the right to participate in investigations and to receive ongoing information as the investigation proceeds, Berta's relatives have been entirely shut out of the process, even to the extent of not receiving notification of the arrests from the Attorney General's office.

The family does not trust that the arrests made are the result of thorough evidence gathered and are concerned that there are no particular...

CRLN Immigration Riads Faith Leader Letter

**Copy of CRLN Faith Leader Letter to Director Ricard Wong Opposing ICE Immigration Raids. This letter, which demonstrates the faith community's unity against immigration raids, was delivered at a press conference outside the local Chicago ICE offices on Thursday, January 28th, 2016.

To: Ricardo Wong

Field Office Director

Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Ricardo.a.wong@ ice.dhs.gov

Dear Director Ricardo Wong,

As you are aware, on December 23rd, the Washington Post published an article that exposed plans by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to start 2016 with mass raids targeting Central American families who had...

MEDIA ADVISORY: Faith Leaders Condemn Immigration Raids, Ask for Relief instead

Media Contact:

Lissette Castillo,(312) 770-0350

lcastillo@crln.org

Local faith community condemns immigration raids, urges local ICE Director to desist from use of “inhumane” and “immoral” tactics against immigrant community

Will deliver an open letter to Director Ricardo Wong, containing over one hundred signatures from faith leaders of multiple faiths and denominations, stressing the role and responsibility of local office in providing “protection, not persecution.”

WHO: Local faith leaders, members of the Chicago Religious Leadership Network on Latin America (CRLN) and its "Immigrant Welcoming Congregations," Red de Oracion, and other faith-based organizations

WHAT: Local faith community united in condemnation of immigration raids will deliver faith leader letter to Chicago ICE Field Director Ricardo Wong. The letter was signed by faith leaders across Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin, as well as several heads of denomination, who all call on Dr. Ricardo Wong to exercise his power of discretion to refrain from further implementation of immigration raids in areas falling under his jurisdiction. Faith leaders will also urge larger faith community to take steps to inform immigrants of their rights and to continue to organize against raids and indiscriminate detention and deportations.

WHEN: Thursday, January 28 at 10 AM, Chicago ICE Office (101 W. Congress)

WHY: Just two days before Christmas, the Washington Post published a story detailing plans by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to start 2016 with mass, nationally coordinated, immigration raids. On January 2nd, local Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) began moving forward with these plans. Since then multiple raids across the country, including some in Illinois, have resulted in the detention of at least 121 immigrants.

Solidarity Over Vilification

Presidential debate season is upon us. And it’s ugly. Violent, in fact. In the past several months, unless you’ve been blissfully disconnected from mainstream media and U.S. politics, you’ve probably heard some deeply xenophobic and racist comments coming from some Presidential candidates, then recycled time and time again through mainstream media. Whether or not we take said candidates seriously, we must acknowledge the implications of their public speeches and glean lessons for the ongoing work we’ve dedicated ourselves to.

CRLN stands in solidarity with those refugees, many of whom are Muslim, who are simultaneously fleeing from and blamed for U.S. funded wars in the Middle East. We express our solidarity with those continuing to organize around the important issues of refugee resettlement, who are combatting Islamophobia and White Supremacy by exposing exploitative political lies and spreading truth about communities in need of compassion. The CRLN also stands with Black and immigrant communities and women who have similarly been the victims of divisive and violent rhetoric and state violence. CRLN works on this solidarity by continuing to support folks fleeing U.S.-sponsored, low-grade warfare, legacies of genocide, and economic violence throughout Latin America who are then subjected to xenophobia, racism and sometimes even detention and deportation here in our country.

Second Illegal and Forced Eviction of El Tamarindo Community in Colombia

Peasant farmers of the El Tamarindo community established themselves on 120 hectares of land on the outskirts of Barranquilla, in northern Colombia, in the search for a safe haven from the long-running civil war taking place in the country. The community of 130 families had been violently displaced from their former homes in other parts of Colombia. However, in 2007, the new area in which the El Tamarindo community had settled was declared a duty-free zone, granting tax exemptions on income tax and import and export duties and making the land very attractive to businesses. Ever since then, local businesses have been claiming ownership over the land and harassing the community. The first forced eviction occurred in 2013. In this eviction, a portion of the community’s houses were destroyed by bulldozers and their crops damaged. Additionally, families had to leave their animals behind, losing their livelihood. The community, which continuously becomes smaller with each eviction, was relocated to an area known as El Mirador.

On December 9 th , 2015, the community began to be forcibly evicted again.

Criminalization of free speech and freedom of the press is 2015 Luncheon theme

180 people gathered at the 2015 CRLN Annual Luncheon to hear guest speaker Lorenzo Mateo Francisco, an indigenous Q’anjob’al radio journalist from Santa Eulalia, Huehuetenango, Guatemala. Lorenzo spoke about official suppression of Guatemalan Indigenous communities’ rights to free speech and freedom of the press. He also pointed out how the Guatemalan government criminalizes leaders in the movement to provide community radio stations, which broadcast in Indigenous languages, preserving and deepening cultural ties, providing momentum for community organizing, informing people of their rights and responsibilities as citizens, and covering events that affect their communities.

One year after the executive annoucements, what's really happening with immigration?

Last Friday, November 20 was the one year anniversary of President Obama’s immigration executive action announcements. It was also the one year anniversary of the Priorities Enforcement Program (PEP) encouraging police/ICE collaboration. On that day--just hours after the DOJ finally filed a request with the Supreme Court for reconsideration of the 5th Circuit Court’s recent decision to rule against the executive actions and to continue to withhold relief from millions of undocumented immigrants--Organized Communities Against Deportations (OCAD), a partner organization, led a press conference outside of the Chicago ICE Office. I was there, listening to the testimonies of undocumented immigrants who one year after the announcements were sharing their stories to move the conversation away from the executive actions and back to the ongoing detention and deportation crisis. An undocumented grandmother, who was denied necessary medications while in detention, reminded us of the negligent and miserable conditions that immigrants continue to endure in detention centers; a young father of US citizen children and longtime resident noted that the executive actions don’t go far enough, explaining that if and when implemented they still won’t cover for the majority of the undocumented community and that they will not shield people like him--who have convictions on their records, in his case a DUI from several years ago--from deportation.

Reflection During Thanksgiving Season / Reflexión Durante los Días de Gracias

(Español abajo)

While many in the CRLN community get ready for family gatherings, warm food, and time off of work, it’s important for us to recognize the history of the Thanksgiving holiday and the mythology that has us celebrating gratitude on Indigenous land that (if you’re in Chicago area) was robbed from the Mascouten, Michigamea, Miami, Potawatomi, Wea, Piankeshaw, and other Indigenous Peoples.

CRLN at the #SOA2015

(Español abajo)

This year, CRLN joined thousands of people down at Ft. Benning Georgia to build connections with organizers and activists from all over the world engaged in the struggles against state violence, forced migration, neoliberal economics and imperialism. CRLN worked with Witness for Peace and Colombia’s Congreso de Los Pueblos (The People’s Congress) to make several Colombia-focused panels possible. We were fortunate to have as part of our CRLN delegation Juan David Lopera, a Colombian organizer formerly part of Congreso de Los Pueblos now living in Chicago. Juan met with his Colombian counterpart Lenoardo Luna in Ft. Benning where they gave workshops about the Peace Process in Colombia. They stressed that, while the talks in Havana are crucial, real peace means economic models that serve the people instead of stealing their lands for the benefit an elite economic class. Juan and Leonardo also shared the work of Congreso de Los Pueblos to build autonomous movements of people power from the grassroots in Colombia to continue shifting power towards the grassroots.

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